KAIST has built a ‘smart’ chessboard

A team of Swiss researchers has built the world’s first chessboard that can read your mind.

KAISET has used the electro-magnetic force to force the board to play its own chess game.

KASTHA is based on a process that creates a magnetic field by creating an electric field around a magnetic coil.

The board uses an electronic chip that can be controlled by a smartphone.

The researchers have built a prototype of a wireless chess board that can calculate moves on the board.

“We built a computer that can think like a human,” says Yuh-Hung Chang, a professor at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich.

The research team, including KAISME (KAIST), at the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, created the first wireless chessboard using the electromagnetic field and a computer.

“The device is wireless, but the real-time chess game is still played on the computer,” Chang says.

The wireless chessboards can read the players’ moves on a chessboard as they move across it.

The device can also calculate moves by comparing the board position of a player to the positions of the board tiles.

The team also built a wireless version of the game board for use with smartphones.

The mobile version of chess is similar to the old board, but is much more portable and can be connected to a mobile phone.

The KAISSET wireless chess game board can be used for both indoor and outdoor chess games.

The technology can be easily installed on a smartphone, and the researchers are working to integrate the device with the smartphone’s GPS, accelerometer and gyroscope.

“It has been very difficult to design a board that works with such a simple concept,” says researcher Yuhan Wu.

The game board consists of two pieces, one at the top and one at a lower end.

The top piece is called a pawn, and it moves at a fixed speed, called the speed of light.

The second piece is a queen, which moves at the same speed, but moves at an unspecified rate.

The computer controlling the chess board calculates the board positions using the speed and direction of the light.

KAKANZO, the team’s second student, created a more complicated chessboard, based on the same principles, but which uses a computer to calculate moves.

The player moves his or her pawn to a central location on the chessboard and a program, called KAKASA, runs on the smartphone to calculate the moves.

KACHIN, the student team’s first student, developed a more complex chessboard based on computer simulations of the human brain.

The program, known as KAKAIC, calculates the moves using the light, speed and other parameters that the brain uses.

The project’s first results showed that the game can be played at a speed of about 0.4m/s (0.6km/s), which is comparable to the speed at which humans play chess.

“Now we are looking for more complicated problems, which require higher speeds,” says KAKAT, a student at the KAISE.

The students are also investigating ways to connect the device to the smartphone.

“With the new technology, we can make a smartphone game with a mobile app,” says Wu.

KISSET’s research has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the German Research Foundation.

ETH Zurich is also supported by NSF.

For more information about this research, contact Yuhuan Wu at [email protected]